Reframing History: Chen Shu 陳書

Chen Shu (1660-1735) was born into an elite family in Jiaxing, China and was the daughter of an artist. This allowed her to study painting as a young girl, despite the mixed feelings about women’s education at the time that kept only a few women of the elite from pursuing an education. Chen Shu studiedContinue reading “Reframing History: Chen Shu 陳書”

Saint and Sinner: The Legacies of Two Byzantine Empresses

The legacies that shape the memory of notable historical figures are passed down through oral and written tradition. Through time and with the storyteller’s bias, these stories and legacies change to create specific memories that stay with the figure and become a part of accepted history. The question becomes how accurate are the legacies andContinue reading “Saint and Sinner: The Legacies of Two Byzantine Empresses”

Exhibition Visit: Sonya Clark: Tatter, Bristle, and Mend

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, access to museums has been extremely limited. As museums reopen, we look forward to sharing our favorite exhibitions from around the Washington DC area and beyond. The National Museum of Women in the Arts recently opened their new exhibition, “Sonya Clark: Tatter, Bristle, and Mend.” This is the first fullContinue reading “Exhibition Visit: Sonya Clark: Tatter, Bristle, and Mend”

Can You Name Five Great Women Artists?

While every month is Women’s History Month at Renaissance Reframed, March is a month for us to contribute our voice to the celebration of Women’s History and reflect upon the important work of scholars, advocates, and organizations who have come before us. We proudly proclaim ourselves as “feminist art historians,” who have dedicated most ofContinue reading “Can You Name Five Great Women Artists?”

Reframing History: Giovanni Antonio Bazzi, aka ‘Il Sodoma’

Giovanni Antonio Bazzi was born in Piedmont, Italy in 1477. He studied the strong coloring and style of the Lombard school of painting, but went on to adopt many of the stylistic features of Leonardo. He is best known for completing a number of church frescos throughout Siena. He is one of the first toContinue reading “Reframing History: Giovanni Antonio Bazzi, aka ‘Il Sodoma’”

Working in the Arts: Claire, Visual Arts and Museum Affairs Assistant

“But what do you do with an art history degree?” I can do whatever I want, thank you very much. It can be difficult to navigate the world of art careers. What can you even do in the arts? How do you find a job? Do you have to work in a museum? Many peopleContinue reading “Working in the Arts: Claire, Visual Arts and Museum Affairs Assistant”

Reframing History: Alessandro de’ Medici, Duke of Florence

Alessandro de’ Medici was the first Duke of the Florence from 1532 to his death in 1537. Alessandro was the last of the senior line of the Medici family to lead Florence, recognized as the only son of Lorenzo II de’ Medici (the grandson of Lorenzo the Great). Yet, there are many questions about whoContinue reading “Reframing History: Alessandro de’ Medici, Duke of Florence”

How to Look at Art

Whenever I mention that I am an art historian, one of the first things people say is either how intimidating they find museums or how they ‘just don’t get art’. Both as an art historian and an art lover, let me tell you that both of these things are easier to overcome than you think.Continue reading “How to Look at Art”

The Learned Paintress: Angelica Kauffman’s “Self Portrait of the Painter Hesitating Between Painting and Music” by Claire Sandberg

 The development of the historiated portrait allowed artist in the British Royal Academy to create self-portraits rich with allegories and classical influences that reflected the ideal image of the learned artist as described by Sir Joshua Reynolds in his Discourses on Art. Following in Reynolds’ example, British Academicienne Angelica Kauffman (1741-1807) used allegories and classicalContinue reading “The Learned Paintress: Angelica Kauffman’s “Self Portrait of the Painter Hesitating Between Painting and Music” by Claire Sandberg”