Renaissance Reframed News Round Up

Catch up on some of the latest news happening in the art world! Woman Finds 2,000-Year Old Roman Bust at Texas Goodwill (Hyperallergic) Budding art collector Laura Young has made a habit of discovering the interesting and overlooked works of art that are often overlooked and sent to thrift stores, but nothing prepared her forContinue reading “Renaissance Reframed News Round Up”

Renaissance Reframed Reflection

This website started out as a passion project after graduating with our Masters and we were unsure we’d be able to find jobs in the midst of the pandemic. Almost two years later, we’re both busy with jobs which has taken away much of our time to focus on sharing with you guys. This meansContinue reading “Renaissance Reframed Reflection”

Reframing History: Anne Vallayer-Coster

Anne Vallayer-Coster was born near Paris in 1744 to a goldsmith and tapestry designer of the royal family. Like many women artists in the 18th century, she trained under her father but also gained some training from botanical specialist Madeleine Basseport and marine painter Joseph Vernet. While she had training, without proper support, she wasContinue reading “Reframing History: Anne Vallayer-Coster”

Catherine de’ Medici’s Identities II

This post is a continued discussion of Catherine de’ Medici. We’d recommend you read this post first before diving into this deeper discussion. NEGOTIATING IDENTITIES AND MEDIATING STATUS Catherine de’ Medici became a deeply engaged art collector and patron after her husband Henri’s death, when she occupied the positions of queen mother or queen regentContinue reading “Catherine de’ Medici’s Identities II”

Reframing History: Edmonia Lewis

The first African American and Native American sculptor to archive international acclaim, Mary Edmonia Lewis was born in New York in 1844. Born to a mother of Mississauga Ojibwe and African-American descent, Lewis was surrounded by Indigenous artisans and sold Ojibwe items to tourists visiting Niagara Falls and the surrounding area. By the time sheContinue reading “Reframing History: Edmonia Lewis”

Reframing History: Luisa Roldán

Luisa Ignacia Roldán (1652-1706) is the earliest documented woman sculptor in Spain, recognized by the Hispanic Society museum as “one of the few women artists to have maintained a studio outside the convents in Golden Age Spain.” She was the daughter of sculptor Pedro Roldán and studied in her father’s workshop alongside her siblings. AroundContinue reading “Reframing History: Luisa Roldán”

Reframing History: Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham

Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham is considered by some to be the United Kingdom’s first female architect and a major patroness of architecture during the 17th century. Born into aristocracy in 1632, Lady Wilbraham married Thomas Wilbraham, the heir to the baronetcy of Wilbraham in 1651. During their honeymoon, the couple traveled throughout Europe and Lady WilbrahamContinue reading “Reframing History: Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham”

The Father of Art History: Giorgio Vasari

Anyone who has studied Renaissance art history can’t escape one name: Giorgio Vasari. Often described as a “father” of art history, Vasari is best known for his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects. This text, a foundation text of art history, is also the keystone of much of our knowledge (and misinformation!)Continue reading “The Father of Art History: Giorgio Vasari”

Museum Workers Unite!

In the wake of a difficult year for museums around the world along with numerous stories of toxic work environments at major museums, museum workers are coming together to advocate for their rights as workers. Over the past year, three major US museums have seen a push for worker unionization; the Guggenheim, the Whitney, andContinue reading “Museum Workers Unite!”

Judith Leyster, A Great Woman Artist?: Leyster’s Self-Portrait (1630-33) and The Influence of Feminist Scholarship

Judith Leyster is the most discussed female painter from the Dutch Baroque period, her Self-Portrait considered one of Leyster’s most prominent works due to its technical skill and content. However, Leyster’s Self-Portrait was not always considered a self-portrait. Following Leyster’s death in 1660, the work was misattributed to Frans Hals for over three centuries untilContinue reading “Judith Leyster, A Great Woman Artist?: Leyster’s Self-Portrait (1630-33) and The Influence of Feminist Scholarship”