Reframing History: Marie Bashkirtseff

Self-Portrait of Marie Bashkirtseff I recently started reading Jennifer Higgie’s “The Mirror and the Palette” which examines self-portraiture by women artists over the last 500 years. While reading the book, I came across an artist that I was completely unfamiliar with but for a brief period of time was considered one of the most famousContinue reading “Reframing History: Marie Bashkirtseff”

Art News Round-Up – August 2022

Stay up to date on the latest news from the art world! This month’s round-up includes exciting new uses of technology to bring art to life, a huge new photography archive of Black American life, restitution, and protests! British Museum proposes new ‘Parthenon partnership’ with Greece in bid to end deadlock over Marbles – TheContinue reading “Art News Round-Up – August 2022”

Reframing History: Anne Seymour Damer, the “Sappho of Sculpture”

When discussing female artists who rejected traditional gender norms, many art historians reference Rosa Bonheur, but before Bonheaur was the so-called “Sappho of Sculpture” Anne Seymour Damer (1748-1828). Damer was an English sculptor, described by English writer, art historian, and politician (and her god-father) Horace Walpole as a “female genius.” In addition to sculpting, sheContinue reading “Reframing History: Anne Seymour Damer, the “Sappho of Sculpture””

Reframing History: Brass Memorial of Agnes Oxenbridge and Elizabeth Etchingham

On the floor of the side aisle of The Assumption of Blessing Mary and St. Nicholas church in Etchingham, England, a brass from the 1480s commemorating two women buried together may be a reminder of an important and close connection between the two and a rare example of a same-sex relationship in the Early ModernContinue reading “Reframing History: Brass Memorial of Agnes Oxenbridge and Elizabeth Etchingham”

Renaissance Reframed News Round Up

Catch up on some of the latest news happening in the art world! Woman Finds 2,000-Year Old Roman Bust at Texas Goodwill (Hyperallergic) Budding art collector Laura Young has made a habit of discovering the interesting and overlooked works of art that are often overlooked and sent to thrift stores, but nothing prepared her forContinue reading “Renaissance Reframed News Round Up”

Renaissance Reframed Reflection

This website started out as a passion project after graduating with our Masters and we were unsure we’d be able to find jobs in the midst of the pandemic. Almost two years later, we’re both busy with jobs which has taken away much of our time to focus on sharing with you guys. This meansContinue reading “Renaissance Reframed Reflection”

Reframing History: Anne Vallayer-Coster

Anne Vallayer-Coster was born near Paris in 1744 to a goldsmith and tapestry designer of the royal family. Like many women artists in the 18th century, she trained under her father but also gained some training from botanical specialist Madeleine Basseport and marine painter Joseph Vernet. While she had training, without proper support, she wasContinue reading “Reframing History: Anne Vallayer-Coster”

Catherine de’ Medici’s Identities II

This post is a continued discussion of Catherine de’ Medici. We’d recommend you read this post first before diving into this deeper discussion. NEGOTIATING IDENTITIES AND MEDIATING STATUS Catherine de’ Medici became a deeply engaged art collector and patron after her husband Henri’s death, when she occupied the positions of queen mother or queen regentContinue reading “Catherine de’ Medici’s Identities II”

Reframing History: Edmonia Lewis

The first African American and Native American sculptor to archive international acclaim, Mary Edmonia Lewis was born in New York in 1844. Born to a mother of Mississauga Ojibwe and African-American descent, Lewis was surrounded by Indigenous artisans and sold Ojibwe items to tourists visiting Niagara Falls and the surrounding area. By the time sheContinue reading “Reframing History: Edmonia Lewis”

Reframing History: Luisa Roldán

Luisa Ignacia Roldán (1652-1706) is the earliest documented woman sculptor in Spain, recognized by the Hispanic Society museum as “one of the few women artists to have maintained a studio outside the convents in Golden Age Spain.” She was the daughter of sculptor Pedro Roldán and studied in her father’s workshop alongside her siblings. AroundContinue reading “Reframing History: Luisa Roldán”