“If It’s Looted, It’s Booted…”: The Benin Bronzes and Repatriation

repatriation (noun) the act or process of restoring or returning someone or something to the country of origin, allegiance, or citizenship : the act of repatriating or the state of being repatriated Over the last few years, a phrase has appeared more and more frequently in headlines and online articles around the world: “the Benin Bronzes.” For thoseContinue reading ““If It’s Looted, It’s Booted…”: The Benin Bronzes and Repatriation”

Reframing History: Luisa Roldán

Luisa Ignacia Roldán (1652-1706) is the earliest documented woman sculptor in Spain, recognized by the Hispanic Society museum as “one of the few women artists to have maintained a studio outside the convents in Golden Age Spain.” She was the daughter of sculptor Pedro Roldán and studied in her father’s workshop alongside her siblings. AroundContinue reading “Reframing History: Luisa Roldán”

Art History Basics: ‘Chiaroscuro’

Learning about art history can be intimidating as it is, but add in the variety of terms borrowed from Italian or French and it can feel like a whole other language (literally!). The term ‘chiaroscuro’, translating to “light-dark,” comes from the Renaissance period when delicate modeling of figures, first in drawing, were created by firstContinue reading “Art History Basics: ‘Chiaroscuro’”

Reframing History: Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham

Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham is considered by some to be the United Kingdom’s first female architect and a major patroness of architecture during the 17th century. Born into aristocracy in 1632, Lady Wilbraham married Thomas Wilbraham, the heir to the baronetcy of Wilbraham in 1651. During their honeymoon, the couple traveled throughout Europe and Lady WilbrahamContinue reading “Reframing History: Lady Elizabeth Wilbraham”

Death and the Artist

If you know me in person, you know I love Halloween, but I also love the spooky, the macabe, and the mysterious. In the lead up to Halloween, I’ve been thinking a lot about the spooky stuff of art history. Death, witches, ghosts, and the occult are only the beginning to some of the insanityContinue reading “Death and the Artist”

The Father of Art History: Giorgio Vasari

Anyone who has studied Renaissance art history can’t escape one name: Giorgio Vasari. Often described as a “father” of art history, Vasari is best known for his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects. This text, a foundation text of art history, is also the keystone of much of our knowledge (and misinformation!)Continue reading “The Father of Art History: Giorgio Vasari”

Behind the Mosque: The Appropriation of Mosques into Gothic Cathedrals in Reconquista Spain by Claire Sandberg

The construction of religious spaces within a society has long served as an important part in establishing authority and creating a community. As the Muslims conquered Spain, they constructed mosques to mark their authority and rule over the country, creating a Muslim community center. As the Christians reclaimed Spain through the Reconquista throughout the 13thContinue reading “Behind the Mosque: The Appropriation of Mosques into Gothic Cathedrals in Reconquista Spain by Claire Sandberg”

Judith Leyster, A Great Woman Artist?: Leyster’s Self-Portrait (1630-33) and The Influence of Feminist Scholarship

Judith Leyster is the most discussed female painter from the Dutch Baroque period, her Self-Portrait considered one of Leyster’s most prominent works due to its technical skill and content. However, Leyster’s Self-Portrait was not always considered a self-portrait. Following Leyster’s death in 1660, the work was misattributed to Frans Hals for over three centuries untilContinue reading “Judith Leyster, A Great Woman Artist?: Leyster’s Self-Portrait (1630-33) and The Influence of Feminist Scholarship”

Exhibition: The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512-1570

When I hear around an upcoming art exhibition, there are few words that get me as excited as “Medici” and “portraits” in the same sentence. The Medici family were the heart of the Italian Renaissance in Florence, serving as major patrons for the arts and supporting many of the most successful artists of the era.Continue reading “Exhibition: The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512-1570”